Tag Archives: Water Stewardship

Channel progressing, secondary one in works

An article in the Winnipeg Free Press today outlining progress on the channel from Lake St. Martin to Big Buffalo Lake.

“Favourable fall weather has given the province confidence that it can complete its ambitious $100-million emergency channel by Nov. 1.

Engineers are looking at moving up construction of the sub-channel, although a final decision has not yet been made, said Paul White, a spokesman for the provincial Water Stewardship department.

When completed, the second outlet would make the new main channel more efficient, especially during spring runoff. “It’s like putting a second drain in your bathtub. You’d drain it a lot faster,” White said.”

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LMFRC seeks proposed channel data; seeks true consultation with government

 (WINNIPEG, Manitoba) August 11, 2011 – The Lake Manitoba Flood Rehabilitation Committee (LMFRC) met with government officials for further clarification about plans to lower the level of Lake Manitoba immediately and into next spring. The committee was told a 30-member engineering team worked around the clock to analyze every possible channel option.

However, officials including Infrastructure and Transportation Deputy Minister Doug McNeil and Manitoba Water Stewardship’s Steve Topping, said the detailed information was not prepared for public distribution at this time. The LMFRC hopes the province will consider sharing this information with taxpayers across the province as it becomes available.

“We are grateful the government is moving forward with a project that will improve the drainage of Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin. The LMFRC feels the rural municipalities should have access to the information used in designing the emergency drainage channels and should be involved in this process,” says Tom Teichroeb, LMFRC Chairperson.

Frustrating to the LMFRC is the constant refrain from Minister of Infrastructure and Transportation Steve Ashton that the government is collaborating with municipalities. To date, the LMFRC has not been involved in any consultation about the emergency drainage channel.

“Not one municipality has received one phone call looking for information about these proposed routes,” says Teichroeb. “Telling us their plan is not consultation. The people who earn their living on and around this lake would like to be involved in the decisions that are affecting the management of Lake Manitoba and Lake St. Martin.”

The Lake Manitoba Flood Rehabilitation Committee represents 11 municipalities surrounding Lake Manitoba. It gives voice to the urgent needs of all residents and businesses for an immediate solution to the flooding. It seeks adequate and inclusive compensation for the rehabilitation of land, businesses and residential properties damaged by the man-made flooding of Lake Manitoba.

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Lake Manitoba reps call for immediate action

(WINNIPEG, Manitoba) July 14, 2011 – The Lake Manitoba Flood Rehabilitation Committee (LMFRC) met with several members of the government to discuss both immediate and long-term solutions to the man-made flooding occurring in and around the Lake Manitoba area. The main concern of the LMFRC is the urgent need to lower the lake.

Infrastructure and Transportation Minister Steve Ashton wouldn’t specify exactly the route of the proposed channel, nor would he put a specific number to the volume the channel could be expected to move. While the minister said the channel would have to move several thousand cubic feet per second (cfs), the LMFRC says the channel must carry between 20,000 – 25,000 cfs to have the required affect. Both parties agree that time is of the essence.

“We should have a concrete plan early next week,” says Ashton. “We know we need to move quickly. Wave action is a huge issue, and then we have the ice coming.”

The LMFRC was pleased to meet with other officials from Water Stewardship, Emergency Measures Organization and Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives, who were generous with their time. However, many members wonder if the government is aware of the severity of the situation.

“We’re dealing with a disaster, and there’s no end in sight. Until we see the shovel in the dirt to build this channel, it’s hard not to be skeptical,” says Tom Teichroeb, Lake Manitoba Flood Rehabilitation Committee Chairperson. “At best, I would say we are cautiously optimistic.”

The Lake Manitoba Flood Rehabilitation Committee represents the 11 municipalities surrounding Lake Manitoba. It gives voice to the urgent needs of all residents and businesses for an immediate solution to the flooding. It seeks adequate and inclusive compensation for the rehabilitation of land, businesses and residential properties damaged by the man-made flooding of Lake Manitoba.

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